Tuesday, May 27, 2008

raised bed is done... with amenities

Here's a picture of what the raised bed looked like this weekend:




Here's a picture of what it looks like now:




And in case you can't see what's posted on the wall at the back edge and in the middle:







Power and water.

25 comments:

Kim and Victoria said...

Oooooh.........Awwwwwww......very cool looking!
The handyman is indeed handy!

eatclosetohome said...

Fancy schmancy! Can I borrow your handyman for a weekend or two? :)

Heather said...

Wow - impressive :-) What are you planting in that bed???

Daisy said...

Well, we grew a ton of tomato from seed. We're trying to make sauces from them, and since we haven't done that before, we're probably going a little overboard with those - but they'll take up quite a bit of space in that bed. Also, there were some yellow squash that I couldn't fit in my space (though I'm the only one that likes to eat them). Some cut flowers, a ton of basil, some oregano, the few onions that survived aphidpalooza, and the fewer cabbage that are still kickin', and any other impulse buys from the farmer's market. I suppose that's it!

Anonymous said...

I did a similar design, how do you keep the wood from rotting out. my raised bed was toast after one year, first year blew out a few sections of panels as well.

Rottmom410 said...

Use pressure treated lumber. Also, use wood deck screws rather than nails as they hold much better.

Breck Cogdill said...

Educate me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't pressure treated wood leach harmful chemicals into the soil oved time?

Great design, though!

Breck Cogdill

April I. said...

What were the dimensions of your planter?
I am looking to recreate for my garden but will be using cinder blocks. I love the design!

Barbara said...

Thanks for this great design idea! I did the same design, but with cinder blocks. Can't wait to plant it!

Anonymous said...

Cedar boards. They are expensive, but will go on sale and will last for years.

Christine Walker said...

@brett cogdill. Chemicals in pressure treated wood leach down (vertically), not out. ( horizontally). They wouldn't get into the keyhole garden soil

Anonymous said...

We have made two long, rectangular, raised beds by laying 4"x4", treated lumber horizontally and stacked. We used overlapping method, reinforced with drilled holes and concrete rebar which we sledge-hammered through and into the ground. We topped them off with 2"8" seating all around. Quite expensive, but have lasted 5 years thus far, and I expect will last a lifetime.

Anonymous said...

To keep the panels from rotting (and in addition to pressure treated lumber - although care is required to ensure that the preservatives in the lumber don't leach into the soil) line the inside sides with landscape fabric.

Alex Franks said...

looks like a new project I found to tinker with

Anonymous said...

Sealing the wood and applying 7 mil plastic fastened to the wood, sealed with silicone, and run buried at least 12" below exterior grade, left open at the bottom with sufficient drainage would extend the life of the box dramatically.

Anonymous said...

In Addition, one could put boards inside and outside of the studs like a traditional wall, and insulate the air space in between to keep the soil more viable for using the raised planters as small greenhouses to extend your grow seasons. Just an idea...

Tricia said...

Love your raised garden. I'd like to build one but I'd most likely have to do it myself. My husband is not as handy as yours (but he cooks, cleans and does laundry!). Does your handyman have directions and a list of needed supplies?

Anonymous said...

I lined my inside with a thick black plastic. It can be removed if needed. Also using PT lumber & PT ply board seems to be great for my Garden.

Stefan said...

That's impressive. A lot of work. At least everything will be tidy.

John Albin said...

Arsenic has not been used in PT wood for just over a decade now. The copper that they use will not harm you or your plants in any way. Use compost and compost tea and NOTHING else. Even "organic" pesticides/herbicides. Start your seeds in soil blocks and keep them watered. The unstressed plants will do great. If you have lots of bugs or weed pressure nature is telling you your soil is not right. Fix it with compost tea.

"Nature is not as complex as you think, it's more complex than you CAN think."

Andy Harris said...

Hey, would be great to get some dimensions for this amazing build.

Marty Lasher said...

Great Design- I suppose the dimensions for the bed would be twice as wide as you can comfortably reach and high enough to defeat the rabbits and woodchucks. The overall dimensions should not exceed the space available. The keyhole slot should be wide enough to comfortably fit your wheelbarrow & lawnmower and be able to make the turn.

Scene Watch said...

Hi, could you possibly post up the dimensions of the raised bed please?
I'd like to do the same for my own garden.

Bryan Kelly said...

Fantastic design! Few questions. How high did you feel the dirt? What is your sun exposure throughout the day?

Anonymous said...

I would never use treated wood or any plastic or pallets if it's for vegetables or fruit due to possible leaching of hazardous chemicals.